upcycled quilt pillowcase.

pillow copy

Earlier this summer, while cleaning out our grandfather’s house – we found these quilts that our great grandmother had made. Quite a few of them actually. Alot of them were tattered and stained, but I couldn’t stand just throwing away something so old and something that so much hard work went into. So I took them and told the family that I would turn them into pillowcases, with the good parts, so that we can all have a piece of her quilts.

I created a simple pillow case with a zipper at the bottom. I plan to mail these to family across the country, so this will make it easy to throw in an envelope and they can stuff a pillow into them when they get them.

I was able to make four pillows from one quilt. I still have three more quilts to go!

dino plushie. for babies!

dinoplushie

I made this little guy using the leftover fleece I bought for milo’s halloween costume.
And I have so much ribbon laying around from my card-making days.

After I was done I wanted to make a ton more! Its was really easy and super fun. And sewing with that microfleece is like butt-a! I have a little more left, so I’m going to figure out something else to make with it. This might just be my g0-to baby gift for the future…

I found the tutorial and pattern here.   The only thing I would do different next time is make the ribbon a little shorter. She suggests 6 inches; i made mine 5 and they were still a little long when i folded them over… But otherwise I think it turned out really cute!

tooth fairy pillow.

toothfairy

My little guy just turned five. I know were probably still a ways off, but I whipped him up a little tooth fairy pillow following this tutorial.

Instead of a fat quarter, I used an old sweater. So its kinda lumpy and a little messy – but I asked milo if i should redo it and he said “no! I love it!” soooo, messy and lumpy toothfairy pillow it is!

This is a really easy project that can come together fairly quickly. However, trying to explain the concept of how the tooth fairy works to a five year old proved to be a little tricky. He just wasn’t really understanding HOW the tooth fairy will know that his tooth is in that pillow. And where should he leave the pillow?! And how much money does the tooth fairy leave? Does she leave presents? I think i have some time to do my tooth fairy training, but in the meantime, we have the pillow situation covered.

 

quilted potholders.

potholders
I took a stab at using some fabric scraps to make these simple potholders.  It was pretty easy, and took almost no time to complete! you will need:

insul-brite lining
fabric, 2 pieces cut 10×10 inches, and a little more for the strap
sewing machine
thread
pencil
Iron

1. Cut two fabric square pieces 10 inches by 10 inches.
2. Cut two or three batting pieces depending on their thickness , 10 inches by 10 inches.
3. Cut one strap 10 inches by 2 1/2 inches.
4. Lay your strap flat, right side down on ironing board. Fold over the edges a bit and iron flat. Fold piece in half and sew seam.
5. Attach the batting pieces to the WRONG side of one of the fabric pieces.

7. Take the strap and lay it on the RIGHT side of the fabric piece in the top left corner.
8. Now lay the other piece of fabric on top of the fabric piece with the strap on it.
9. Pin all the layers together.
10. Sew all of the layers together with a 3/8 inch seam allowance. Leave a 2-3 inch opening on one of the sides.
11. Trim the corner edges of the potholder.
 13. Pull the potholder through the gap you left unsewn. Pop out your corners of the potholder.
14. Iron the potholder flat, ironing the little gap closed.
15. Topstitch around the potholder edges with a1/4 inch seam allowance, sewing the gap shut.
15. Draw straight lines in both directions on the potholder with chalk or a pencil. Make them evenly spaced, about 2 inches apart. Stitch on the lines, quilting the potholder.

quilted coasters.

Quiltedcoasters

This is a great little project to use up some of your fabric scraps. These coasters are placed together in squares, then cut into circles. It’s great practice of sewing along curves too! I definitely plan to make more as I accumulate more scraps. This was my first time doing any kind of quilting, and I have to say, it was quite gratifying. Maybe I’ll take on a little bigger quilting something or other…. Any suggestions for smaller quilting projects? I’d love to see!

Here’s what you will need to do for four coasters.

Cut 24 3×3 squares out of your fabric. Lay out the squares to decide what order you want them: There will be four used in each coaster. Begin with two squares and sew them together, right sides facing, to form one piece Press open the seam. Sew two more squares together, and press open the seam. Next, pin the two joined pieces together, right sides facing and the seams aligned. Sew together, to form the coaster top. Press open the seam. Repeat to make three more coaster tops.

 Now, Cut circle shapes. I used a wide-mouthed glass as my template, and trace a circle on top of the patchwork pieces. Make sure to center the circle template on your fabric. Cut these circles out. I traced the glass on the backside of the patchwork, then cut a little larger than what I traced so that I could use this as my seam allowance and sew directly on the line I drew*. Cut the coaster backing fabric and some fusible fleece into four circles each.  (*I did the same thing here.)

Place one coaster top, right-side up, on a fusible fleece circle, wrong side facing the fusible (textured) side of the fleece circle. Using a hot iron, fuse the fabric to the fleece. Repeat with the remaining three coaster tops and three fleece circles.

Quilt the tops. With a chalk pencil or erasable marking pen, mark the stitch lines on a coaster top as shown on the template, with the two lines intersecting in the center. You will be stitching through the coaster top and fleece only (the backing will be added in the next step). Quilt according to your marked
lines (see figure C). Repeat with the other three remaining coaster tops.

Sew backing to quilted top piece. With a backing fabric piece and a quilted top piece together, right sides facing, sew around the edge with a 1/4-in, leaving a 1½-in opening to turn the coaster right-side out. Or you can just sew along the line that you drew in the step* above. Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of your stitches. Repeat with the other three coasters.

Close and topstitch. Turn one coaster right-side out by pulling it gently through the opening. Push out the inner seam so it makes a smooth circular shape. Turn the fabric under at the opening by ¼ in and press flat and pin if necessary. Topstitch around the edge of the coaster, about 1/8 in from the edge, sewing the opening closed and flattening the edges. Repeat to finish the other three coasters.

Original source found here.

showoff bag.

showoffBag

I love made by rae patterns. They are always so cute, and the patterns are well priced and very easy to understand. I made the washi dress this summer, and I still can’t believe I made a dress – THAT I CAN WEAR!

I love this bag! The pattern is only $8. It was pretty easy to make – and only has three pattern pieces, so the prep time is even pretty fast. I love how this bag came out, and I definitely want to make more! The possibilities seem endless! I see a few more of these in my future for sure!

sock monkey.

SOCKMONKEY11135866625_7c7d4737b7_h

This has been on my to-do list forever! And a few months ago, the thrift store had the socks I needed for 99 cents. I made this guy for milo for christmas, and I’m so so excited to give it to him! I love how it turned out, and I can’t believe how easy these are to make!!

I looked at tutorials online, but in the end ended up following this you tube video. Everything is very well explained and I even learned how to properly do a whip stitch and a slip stitch!

Are you making anything handmade this christmas? They are my favorite kinds of gifts to give!

m&m costume.

IMG_1706IMG_1708
This year milo decided he wanted to be an M&M for halloween. A few weeks ago joanne’s was having a sale – all fleece 50% percent off, so I was able to make him this costume in no time, and for under $15!

Materials needed:

about 1.5 yards of fleece
1/4-1/2 yard white felt
satin ribbon
stuffing
sewing machine and thread

Making this costume was pretty easy. I didnt follow a pattern, and just kind of made it up as I went along. I used drum head as my guide – and traced four circles (two for the front and two for the back). I made the “M”‘s out of white felt and sewed them on to the center of two of the circles. I used satin ribbon for the shoulder straps. And I stuffed the circles with some filling from old pillows (we JUST bought new ones, so we had old pillows to spare!) I attached some satin ribbon to the sides as well, to help keep it from moving around too much. Then with some leftover fleece, i sewed a quick hat, basically tracing an existing hat and sewing the two sides together.

kid’s size reversible apron.

reversibleApron_makegreat

I made this reversible apron for my friend’s daughter’s birthday. You make it with a fat quarter, and you use every piece of the fabric because you turn the armholes into pockets! It was my first time using rick-rack, but I love the little flair it adds to the apron. This is a pretty easy project, and it takes no time to sew! The instructions are really well explained, and can be found here.    Seems like the possibilities are endless…..I definitely see more of these in my future, especially because I saw some awesome superhero fabric at Jo-anns the other day that was just calling Milo’s name!

washi dress.

IMG_0756

Ah! So sorry for the lack of posts. I promise you I have been busy making things! :)
Summer has gotten the best of us, I guess!

Anyway, something about the long holiday weekends makes me want to take on a sewing project. And thats just what I did. My friend Emily and I have been drooling over this pattern since she launched it. We purchased it last September, and have been purchasing fabric since then with the dreams that someday we will execute this dress. We were both kind of timid going into this, but knew with eachother’s help we could figure it out.

We got a later than we wanted start on friday afternoon, and got to it. I used a sheet from the thrift store, so if it worked out, it would be cute, but if it didn’t, I only lost $1.99. Glad I used the sheet because it was definitely a learning experience. The sheet was probably too sheer to use as a dress and because it was a sheet, it was kind of more potato-sacky than I would have liked. I also got to really test the fit and see how it works. According to my measurements, I was probably in between a xs and small, so I went with a small the first time around. I retraced my pattern pieces and resized my muslin in a xsmall, and I went for it, hoping for less bulk in the back, and it seemed to work.

This pattern taught me some new things: darts! pleating! understitching! sleeves! Shiring! And I accomplished them all. Emily and I didnt get to actually finish on friday, so on Sunday I took the day and made my “real” dress – referring to you tube when I needed help. Overall the instructions are VERY well explained, and the dress is super versatile and really cute. There are lots of easy things you can do to personalize it, dress it up, dress it down, etc. I plan to make at least another one…or two…. :)

You can see other completed dresses here. If you are a beginner sewer, like me, and looking to kick your sewing projects up a notch, go for the washi dress. You can totally do it!

(oh! the fabric I used is by “dear stella” and its pretty much my stella’s color!)

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